Tag Archives: Later Carthaginian

Celtiberians – “They died with obstinate resolution”

The Battle of Great Plains or Campi Magni in 203 BCE was a disaster for Carthage, ultimately resulting in Hannibal being recalled from Italy to safe the day and finding his master in Scipio Africanus at Zama a year later (cf. Goldsworthy, 2003, 294-298).

At the first charge of the Roman cavalry both Carthaginian cavalry and infantry at the wings were driven from their ground, leaving exposed the centre formed by Celtiberian mercenaries. But it was here, faced with their imminent demise,  that they made a name for themselves and allowed the Carthaginian and Numidian commanders Hasdrubal and Syphax to escape:

The Celtiberian line, though stripped of the support of both the wings, stood their ground; for neither did any hope of safety by flight present itself, as they were ignorant of the country, nor could they expect pardon from Scipio, against whom, though he had deserved well both of them and their nation, they had come into Africa to fight for hire. [9] Surrounded, therefore, on all sides by the enemy, they died with obstinate resolution, falling one upon another; and, while the attention of all was turned upon them, Syphax and Hasdrubal gained a considerable space of time to effect their escape (Liv. 30.8-9).

This was not a singular event, quite the opposite: Diodorus Siculus explains that “the Celtiberians advanced far in fame and were subdued by the Romans with difficulty and only after they had faced them in battle over a long period” (Diod. 5.33.1). And indeed they were one of the last to be overcome by the Romans after 200 years of upheavals and conflict on the Iberian peninsular (for campaigns in the 2nd century BCE see Quesada, 2006b).

But who were the Celtiberians? How did their panoply look like and how did they fight? I shall give  an overview of the historical background of these fierce warriors, tactical considerations when using them in Field of Glory and finally some thoughts about sculpting and painting of my – now sadly OOP – Corvus Belli Celtiberians.

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Iberian Scutati – “Esteemed to be the most warlike barbarians that now are.”

Ancient Iberia and Carthage had a long-standing relationship. May it be trading relations, cultural exchange or military support.  Even more so when Carthage expanded into Iberian territory in the aftermath of the First Punic war to establish a permanent presence and exploit its riches and man power for the dawning conflict with Rome.

The Carthaginians relied heavily on foreign contingents in their armies, with Iberian troops being no exception. They supplied both lightly armed and medium infantry and formed a major element of a great many Carthaginian armies throughout the ages.

In this post I will focus on my mix of Xyston and Corvus Belli Iberian medium infantry, commonly known as Scutati, named aptly after their oval shield, the scutum or its greek equivalent thureos. A historical introduction will be followed by some tactical considerations with regard to using them in Field of Glory. Finally the sculpting and painting of the miniatures will be expounded on.

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Numidian Light Cavalry – the extended arm of the Carthaginian army

Hannibal’s Numidian cavalry was famed for its performance in battle, but also very apt in small-scale operations. During the battle of Cannae their conduct made victory for Hannibal possible, yet at Zama them changing sides helped along with his demise.

A Later Carthaginian army is unthinkable without them and in many rule systems they are an obligatory element of the army list. I decided to use Corvus Belli for my Numidian contingent and can say I don’t regret it.

I shall give  an overview of the historical background of these fabled riders, tactical considerations when using them in Field of Glory and finally some thoughts about sculpting and painting of the Corvus Belli miniatures.

 

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Liby-Phoenician Spearmen – The backbone of any Carthaginian army

My Hannibal in Spain project is almost finished, but so far I only posted a rough overview and my army list.

In a series of articles I will now introduce the different units of my Carthaginian army, complete with pictures of the painted models and some notes about their usage in Field of Glory.

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Heed the Call – Battle Cry 2014 FoG Ancients tournament report Part II

On the first day of the FoG tournament at Battle Cry 2014 I followed closely Carthage’s path in the second century BCE:  a string of set backs culminating in its destruction. On the morning of the second day I was told that I will play against the two top players in the tournament, both fielding well composed and so far very successful chariot armies. While this meant that I would have it even harder than the day before, I also looked forward to play against their armies, as they were quite different compared to the ones I played against the day before. The final game of the day would be fought with Stonehenge in sight, as my Carthaginians faced Early Scots.

I had only time for a short prayer to Ba’al-Hamon before I had to face king Shattuara, Agamemnon and finally Áedán mac Gabráin. Would the second day be my Cannae or my Zama?

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Heed the Call – Battle Cry 2014 FoG Ancients tournament report Part I

We had quite a good turnout this year with eight competitors and a nice mix of armies (Vikings, Early Scots, Late Republican Romans, Later Carthaginians, Spartans, Lydian Greeks, Later Mycenaeans and Mitanni). Armies had to be 600 AP and we played on a smaller table size (150 x 90), all with the aim to have a decisive outcome earlier and allow a more relaxed pace while playing. Terrain was also reduced to the two compulsory pieces and only two more pieces each, instead of up to four choices per player. Battleline Miniatures contributed prices and helped with the organisation of the event.

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Heed the Call – Battle Cry Convention 2014

Nothing compares to spending a hot, sunny weekend packed together with like-minded people in a sports hall playing wargames! Especially if it is a small, relaxed and fun convention like Battle Cry.

Being the major annual convention for gamers in New Zealand’s biggest city (but surprisingly not its capital) Auckland, it surely offered a lot of program: Tournaments for Field of Glory Ancients and Napoleonic, Flames of War, X-Wing,  Epic, 40k and WH Fantasy, Infinity, Kings of War and many more. Boardgames and card games were featured, too, including different Magic the Gathering  formats, Munchkin, a Carcassonne tournament and demo games of new New Zealand made board- and wargames.

I did compete in the two day Field of Glory Ancients tournament this year and will give a report on the format and how my games went in two seperate posts. In this one I will give some impressions of the convention and show you some of the beautiful gaming tables and other attractions.

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